Getting Started Archive

3 Ways to Create Comfort at the Piano

Having taught many beginners over the years, most of them children between the ages of 7 and 9, one thing is very clear to me: Pianos are adult size. While there are ½ size violins, there are no ½ size pianos.

As a parent, what can you do to ensure your child’s success so they can comfortably grow into the adult size piano over time?

1. Provide a footstool.   A pianist’s feet need to be in contact with the ground to feel secure when they play.  If your child’s feet don’t reach the ground, place a several inch book or a small footstool from a store under their feet.

2. Make sure the piano bench is high enough. When your child is seated with their feet on the floor (or on the footstool mentioned above), and their shoulders are relaxed and hanging down from their body, have them bend their elbows and place their hands on the keys. Their forearms should be parallel to the floor.

Adjust the bench height (for small children that usually means increase the height) until their forearms are parallel to the floor. You can find a 1-2 inch book to sit on, or take a blanket and fold it up to sit on. You can use a pillow, but sometimes they are too soft for the student to feel secure on the bench.

3. Invest in a piano lamp. Having good lighting that lights up the keyboard and the music will make it easier for your child to focus on learning how to play. As an adult, I can feel the strain on my eyes when I don’t have great lighting. I highly recommend good lighting for your child.

Learning to play the piano is one of the most challenging and rewarding activities your child will undertake. Helping your child feel physically supported when seated at the piano will free them up to place all of their focus on learning how to play. Before you know it, your home will be filled with beautiful music.

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Do Pianos Get Better With Age? Unfortunately, No.

I once had a beginning adult student who found a decent starter piano for her home. Over several months she began to realize that she could play the piano at her lesson more easily than the piano in her home. Frustration and the thought of quitting entered her mind. Fortunately, she was an adult and could express this to me, and to a piano technician.

It turned out that the piano in her home needed some maintenance work to make it more playable. While a skilled pianist could have played that piano, it would have taken a lot of effort on the part of the pianist. It was not suitable for a brand new beginner who was just beginning to learn the skills to play the piano.

In learning to play the piano, you really need a good piano to be successful from the beginning. Success brings enjoyment, and if you are enjoying your time at the piano, you will keep coming back.

If you have a child who wants to learn to play the piano, and you worry if they will stick with it, find a good piano. Sometimes a child wishing to quit is really them saying they don’t feel successful. Just changing to a better quality instrument can make all the difference in the world.

If you are thinking about lessons and would like help finding a piano, give us a call at 360-527-9626.

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Piano Lamp

As a child, I loved to read.  I always had a book in my hands.  I would read a book anywhere.  I recall my dad always telling me to get better light.  Only if I sat under a good lamp and read was he completely satisfied.

I didn’t think much of this idea of good lighting until I got older and became a professional accompanist playing in churches, many of which had very poor lighting.

There was one venue, however, that had superb lighting.  It had a fluorescent desk lamp that lit the keyboard and the music so well that the piano was easy to play.  It was my favorite place to play.

When I did not have that kind of lighting, I really noticed it.  It was more difficult to read the music and to play the piano.  To save my eyesight, and to make my job easier, I started bringing my own piano lamp to the poorly lit venues.

I share this with you because when you’re just starting out sometimes it is easy to overlook lighting, but it can have an impact on the success of your child.

When you get your first piano and are deciding where you will put it in your home, consider the lighting. Having good lighting will make it easier for your child to focus on learning how to play. If needed, invest in a piano lamp. It will only support your child in their success at the piano.

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One Reason Why Kids Quit

I once had a student who took lessons for a few years, and had an incredible ear. Unfortunately, the starter piano she had deteriorated in quality over the years and developed a buzzing sound right in the middle of the piano where she played. Soon she was barely practicing, if at all.

Her parents did not want to spend the money to upgrade to a better piano unless she practiced and showed more commitment. It was a catch 22. She could not stand to play the piano because of the buzzing, but if she didn’t, piano would come to an end.

A good piano is an investment in your child’s future. What does that future look like? No one knows for sure. It’s understandable that as the parent, you want to first make sure it will be worth it. Unfortunately, there’s no guarantee.

However, I can say that the best chance you have of your child’s success is providing a quality piano and keeping it in tune. The best way to ensure that your child quits is to expect them to practice on a poor quality piano or electronic keyboard.

Unfortunately, the student in the story above did not start practicing more and eventually quit after four years of lessons. It is remarkable that she hung on that long. Ironically, she never said she did not like to play the piano. Her sensitive ears just could not stand the buzzing sounds coming from the piano.

Do yourself and your child a favor. Invest in your child’s future. Find a quality piano they can practice on so they can feel successful from the beginning.

For tips on buying a piano, click here.

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Make Music As A Family This Christmas

While we are in the middle of August right now, no one is thinking about Christmas. However, would you like to make music as a family this Christmas?

It’s amazing how beginning students light up when they realize they have the skills to play their favorite Christmas song for the first time. It is even more amazing when siblings and parents dust off their music skills and figure out how they can all play the same Christmas song together. With a little instruction in basic harmony and counting aloud, soon the family music group is born.

If you would like to make music as a family this Christmas, now is the time to start lessons, either for your children or for yourself. Let the teacher know your goals. Before you know it, you and your family will be making music together at Christmas. You only have something to gain.

If you would like help getting started learning how to play the piano, give us a call at 360-527-9626. Your music dreams are about to unfold. We can’t wait to help you.

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Keyboard vs. Piano from a Child’s Point of View

I recently talked to the 12 year-old daughter of a friend of mine in another city that began piano lessons with an electronic keyboard at home to practice on. She stopped after a few months, but a year later resumed when her mom found a piano for their home. Here’s what she had to say about her experience practicing on a keyboard, and then later on a piano, and the challenges of learning to play the piano.

1. How did you find practicing on the keyboard?

It was frustrating because the keyboard couldn’t respond with the variety of sound a piano does. I worked hard, but the keyboard just didn’t measure up to what a piano could do. I also had trouble playing a real piano because my keyboard was not full-size, so I never knew where middle C was.

2. How long did you do lessons on a keyboard before you quit?

A few months.

3. Now that you have a piano, how do you compare the two?

I really like the piano. I want to play it, and I like practicing.

A few years later, my friend’s child is still enjoying piano lessons and practicing on her piano. She has even started to explore duets on her own with her sibling who plays the violin. This all began when the piano became a part of their home.

If you are looking to get started with piano lessons and want music in your home, invest in a piano. Your child will progress more quickly and is more likely to continue long-term with lessons than if they only had an electronic keyboard.

For tips on buying a piano, click here. For ideas on where you can find pianos in the community to practice on, click here. If you would like further assistance, please give us a call at 360-527-9626. We are happy to help you find a piano.

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Falling in Love with Learning

“Fall in love with the process and the results will come.”

I recently saw this quote advertising a gym, and it reminded me of how true it is when learning to play the piano. In our culture of technology where information is instant, the experience of a process to achieve something can be unfamiliar and uncomfortable.

Children learning to play the piano are also used to learning all sorts of things at school, in sports and in other activities. Kids can have stumbling blocks, but they typically haven’t refined their competence to the level an adult has, and therefore, it’s not uncommon for adults to have difficulty “falling in love” with the process of learning.

This can be especially difficult for adults learning to play the piano for the first time. After spending years as an adult, becoming competent in work and life, who wants to feel incompetent trying to learn a new skill? Setting aside the judgment of incompetence and instead falling in love with the process of learning, is the key to success.

How do you do that? First, give yourself a break. You’re not suppose to already know how to play the piano well. That’s the purpose of lessons. Second, find a teacher you trust, where you feel empowered to take chances.

If you would like to explore the idea of lessons, give us a call at (360) 527-9626. You can even call and schedule your own introductory 40-minute lesson for only $50. It’s a great way to experience the piano first-hand.

A whole new world awaits you. You just have to take the first step.

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Determination

An acquaintance of mine recently found a piano for her home and is so excited to be playing the piano. She took lessons as a child, and now as an adult enjoys learning how to play again.

She commented on her struggles and joys of learning piano as an adult. She said when she’s trying to work something out, she just keeps trying, and approaches learning with a sense of humor and allowing herself to make mistakes. Her advice to others is to just keep trying because you will come out on the other side, and it will be worth it.

When learning anything new, how often do you give up after the first try, or after the second or third? I remind my students that the American author, Ernest Hemingway was turned down either 50 or 100 times by publishers before he finally found someone to publish his now famous book, The Old Man and the Sea.

Where do you have that kind of determination? Whatever you are learning, approach it with the mindset that it will happen. When and how you may not know, but it will happen. Ask for help, and keep trying. You will see the way unfold before you.

If you or your child would like help getting started in piano, call us today about lessons.

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Aural Development

As your child grows as a musician, so will their ear. It’s not uncommon for children to have sensitive ears. Becoming a musician will develop that sensitivity even more. To make beautiful music at the piano, sensitive ears are a requirement, and they develop over time and practice.

If there’s a downside to developing a good ear, it’s this: the piano that used to work just fine a few years ago isn’t so great anymore according to your child. Their ears begin to pick up changes in the tone quality of different keys on the piano. They can hear when a key begins to go out of tune.

Fine musicians need this level of sensitivity to communicate the emotional content of a piece of music. That is how they can knock your socks off when you listen to them play. As these aural skills increase, having a quality piano that can meet or exceed the skills of the pianist will catapult their listening skills even further.

Does this mean that you need to go out and buy a 50K piano? No. However, it does mean providing a quality piano and having it tuned at least once a year. In addition, listen to your child when they tell you the piano doesn’t sound right. If your child hasn’t been practicing lately, ask yourself if the piano needs to be tuned.

One word of caution: If you child practices on an out-of-tune piano, after a while they will begin to think the “out-of tune” piano is normal and the “in-tune” piano at their lesson is out of tune.

Your child’s ears will develop one way or the other. Provide a quality piano. Keep it in tune, and soon your child will be knocking your socks off with beautiful music in your home.

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Piano Dream

I recently attended a social gathering where I met a woman in her forties who shared with me her childhood piano story. In grade school she took piano lessons from the school music teacher during recess. Her parents bought her a little keyboard to practice on at home. She liked her piano lesson because it was the one time she got to play a real piano. She rarely practiced on her keyboard at home. It just wasn’t the same as the piano at her lesson. Because she didn’t practice much, she didn’t progress much. Eventually she stopped lessons.

As she reflected on this experience as an adult, she commented, “If I had a real piano to practice on as a child I may have kept with it and actually progressed.” Today she dreams about buying her own piano and taking lessons again.

How about you? Are you an adult dreaming about learning to play the piano, or are you a parent of a child interested in piano lessons? Either way, find a piano to make part of your home, or find a piano in your community to practice on. It will make a huge difference in your success and your child’s success.

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